Doctors share tips on how to safely workout out in the Texas heat

Doctors share tips to people who workout in the Texas heat

Dell Medical School Assistant Professor Dr. Scott Selinger said it’s better to run or workout outside in the morning or evenings and hydrate before, run in a shaded area if possible, and wear lightweight, light-colored clothing.

AUSTIN, Texas – Doctors are warning people about the dangers associated with the Texas heat. In Central Texas, temperatures are expected to reach about 105 degrees this weekend.

“Oh yeah, you definitely will sweat more,” runner Nelson De Los Santos said.

The temperatures are rising, but many people are still working out outside.

“I mean, we can’t change the weather, but we can control our actions in terms of trying to live healthier lifestyles,” fitness coach Matthew Choi said.

Fitness coaches Choi and Angela Gargano said the weather shouldn’t deter people from working out.

“It’s definitely a lot harder, but I always like to think to myself, ‘if I can do it right now when I’m basically dying, I can do it anytime,'” Gargano said.

Choi said figure out a time in your schedule to fit in a workout outside, with the weather in mind.

“Honestly for me when I go on runs I typically have to go in the morning,” Choi said.

Dell Medical School Assistant Professor Dr. Scott Selinger said it’s better to run or workout outside in the morning or evenings and hydrate before, run in a shaded area if possible, and wear lightweight, light-colored clothing.

“You see a lot of people when it gets hotter out, your blood vessels dilate, your blood pressure drops and especially runners when they’re usually very physically fit, it gets very hot, they may be dehydrated, they’re at higher risk of passing out,” Dr. Selinger said.

He said if you don’t take precaution, you could experience heat exhaustion.

“Like when you’re sick, when you start feeling nauseous, when you start feeling a little headachy, when you start feeling a little tired,” Dr. Selinger said.

He said to drink water immediately and try to cool down. If not, it could lead to a heat stroke.

“You’re not thinking clearly, you’re not communicating with others clearly, you have trouble moving, walking,” Dr. Selinger said.

If that happens, it’s an emergency. Dr. Selinger said if you see someone struggling, try to help out.

“Look out for other people in our community,” Dr. Selinger said.

Dr. Selinger said if you have to run less miles one day to stay safe, you’ll be happier when you can get up and run the rest the next day.

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